bring

A more natural and intelligent way (as opposed to the default 'require' function) to import packages to your nodejs application.

npm install bring
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bring

A more natural and intelligent way (as opposed to the default "require" function) to import packages to your nodejs application.

Instead of doing var authService = require("../../services/core/authService"); you can do any of the following:

Assuming services is in your project's root directory

var authService = bring("/services/core/authService");

or using a partial path to the module

var authService = bring("core/authService");

or just the module name

var authService = bring("authService");

(This project is trying to use Semantic Versioning and is currently on v0.1.3)

Installation

Just do an npm install bring then:

var bring       = require("bring");
var authService = bring("authService");

Usage

"bring" supports many natural ways to import your packages. Just type in anything you feel natural to you and it will bring the module you had in mind!

Application Code

Use slash as your application's root directory not the system's root (OMG!)

var authService = bring("/services/core/authService");

Use double (or more) slashes for the system's root directory (I can't imagine why you would need to do that!)

var wieredModuleFromOtherLocation = bring("//home/jay/otherLocation/wieredModule");

Use only the module name if you feel like it (It doesn't matter where it is located "bring" will just bring it to you!)

var authService = bring("authService");

Use a partial path to your module is also possible

var authService = bring("core/authService");

Use the folder name if you will (the trailing slash is there just for you to know that it's a directory!)

var userService = bring("services/user/");

You can always use relative paths like "./somePath" or "../../someOtherPath"

var authService = bring("../../services/core/authService");

And of course you can always "bring" default node modules or installed modules (in the "node_modules" directory)

var fs = bring("fs");

Test Code

"bring" will help you a lot in writing your tests, because test are always in a separate folder (I hope...) and it is very hard to "require" them with all the nasty relative paths. All you have to do is just using one of the described ways above and forget about all the headaches you had before you knew "bring"!

Inspiration

nadav-dav's Rekuire

License

(The MIT License)

Copyright (c) 2014 ISMOT Group < support@ismotgroup.com >

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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