canto34

A library for helping you build recursive descent parsers and regex-based lexers

npm install canto34
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Canto 34 is a library for building recursive-descent parsers.

When it comes to writing a parser, you get two main choices. Write your own, or use a parser generator like PEGJS or ANTLR.

I've never really had much success with parser generators, and it's always seemed pretty easy to write a recursive-descent parser yourself, if you have some basic tools like a regex-based lexer, and some basic functions for matching tokens and reporting errors. Canto34.js gives you the functions you need to write a regex-based lexer and a recursive descent parser yourself.

A Simple Example

Here's a simple example of a language which just defines name-value pairs;

foo 1, bar 5, baz 8.

We'll see how to parse this language. First, you write a lexer which identifies the different kinds of token -- names, integers, commas, and periods;

var lexer = new canto34.Lexer();

// add a token for whitespace
lexer.addTokenType({ 
    name: "ws",       // give it a name
    regexp: /[ \t]+/, // match spaces and tabs
    ignore: true      // don't return this token in the result
});

// add a token type for names, defines as strings of lower-case characters
lexer.addTokenType({ name: "name", regexp: /^[a-z]+/  });

// bring in some predefined types for commas, period, and integers.
var types = canto34.StandardTokenTypes;
lexer.addTokenType(types.comma());
lexer.addTokenType(types.period());
lexer.addTokenType(types.integer());

And here's how you use it;

var tokens = lexer.tokenize("foo 1, bar 2.");

which returns a set of tokens;

[
    { content: "foo", type: "name",    line: 1, character: 1 },
    { content: 1,     type: "integer", line: 1, character: 5 },
    { content: ",",   type: "comma",   line: 1, character: 6 },
    { content: "bar", type: "name",    line: 1, character: 8 },
    { content: 2,     type: "integer", line: 1, character: 12 },
    { content: ".",   type: "period",  line: 1, character: 13 }
]

Now you feed these tokens into a parser. Here's a parser for our language;

var parser = new canto34.Parser();
parser.listOfNameValuePairs = function() {
    this.result = [];
    this.nameValuePair();
    while (!this.eof() && this.la1("comma")) {
        this.match("comma");
        this.nameValuePair();
    }
    this.match("period");
};

parser.nameValuePair = function() {
    var name = this.match("name").content;
    var value = this.match("integer").content;
    this.result.push({ name:name, value: value });
};

And it's used like this;

var tokens = lexer.tokenize("foo 1, bar 2, baz 3.");
parser.initialize(tokens);
parser.listOfNameValuePairs();

parser.result now contains the value;

[
    {name:"foo", value:1},
    {name:"bar", value:2},
    {name:"baz", value:3},
]

And we're done! That's a basic lexer and parser, written in thirty lines of code.

What's canto34.js good for?

Canto 34 is designed for quickly writing parsers for straightforward domain- specific languages (DSLs). Please don't use it for writing parsers for general-purpose programming languages -- it's not designed to be that fast or powerful.

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