grunt-bake

Bake external includes into files to create static pages with no server-side compilation time

npm install grunt-bake
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grunt-bake Build Status

Bake static pages for production while using modular files while in development.

Getting Started

This plugin requires Grunt ~0.4.0

If you haven't used Grunt before, be sure to check out the Getting Started guide, as it explains how to create a Gruntfile as well as install and use Grunt plugins. Once you're familiar with that process, you may install this plugin with this command:

npm install grunt-bake --save-dev

Once the plugin has been installed, it may be enabled inside your Gruntfile with this line of JavaScript:

grunt.loadNpmTasks( "grunt-bake" );

The "bake" task

Overview

This module helps creating static pages while still having the coding comfort of multiple small files. It also helps not to repeat yourself as includes can be used at multiple places.

The module parses the files recursivly, meaning it allows for nested includes. While parsing the includes it also performs a simple find and replace on placeholders. The replacements are supplied in a JSON file but more an here.

When grunt-bake parses files it looks for anchors like this: <!--(bake path/to/file.html)-->.

Setup the bake task like so:

grunt.initConfig( {
    bake: {
        your_target: {
            options: {
                // Task-specific options go here.
            },

            files: {
                // files go here, like so:

                "dist/index.html": "app/index.html",
                "dist/mobile.html": "app/mobile.html"

                // etc ...
            }
        },
    },
} )

With a app/index.html file like this one:

<html>
    <head></head>
    <body>
        <!--(bake includes/container.html)-->
        <!--(bake includes/footer.html)-->
    </body>
</html>

The paths given are relative to the file being parsed.

Options

options.content

Type: String or Object Default value: null

A string value that determines the location of the JSON file that is used to fill the place holders. If a Object is specified it will be used as content.

options.section

Type: String Default value: ""

A string that determines which subsection of the JSON passed as content should be used. If no section is passed the entire JSON will be used for templating.

Given a content JSON like such:

{
    "en": {
        "title": "Book",

        "info": {
            "author": "Joe Do",
            "job": "Writer"
        }
    },

    "de": {
        "title": "Buch",

        "info": {
            "author": "Joe Do",
            "job": "Schreiber"
        }
    }
}

If "en" is passed as section, { "title": "Book", "info": { ... } } will be passed to the include. If no section is specified the entire JSON will be passed.

This could be used to parse a template like such:

<div>{{title}}</div>
<div>
    <span>{{info.author}}</span>
    <span>{{info.job}}</span>
</div>

options.parsePattern

Type: Regex Default value: /\{\{\s?([\.\-\w]*)\s?\}\}/g

Determines the regex to parse the files in order to insert the content from the JSON file. The default pattern allows place holders such as: {{value}}.

options.process

Type: Function Default value: default process procedure

A Function which is used to process the template before putting it into the file. If process is defined as null or false the includes won't be processed at all. The default process uses two curly braces as marker, such as {{json.value.name}}. However the the parse regex is costumizable using options.parsePattern.

The function gets passed two arguments:

  • String: representing the template to parse.
  • Object: the content from the JSON file as object.

options.basePath

Type: String Default value: ""

Determines the base directory for includes that are specified with an absolute path. All paths starting with an / are absolute while other paths starting with folder or file names are relative to the include being parsed.

<!--(bake includes/footer.html)--> relative to the file

<!--(bake /includes/footer.html)--> relative to the basePath (level of Gruntfile by default)

Usage Examples

Simple bake

This example shows a simple baking process with all default options.

grunt.initConfig( {
    bake: {
        build: {
            files: {
                "app/index.html": "app/base.html"
            }
        }
    }
} )

app/base.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <!--(bake includes/container.html)-->
    </body>
</html>

app/includes/container.html:

<div id="container"></div>

This bake task will create app/index.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="container"></div>
    </body>
</html>

Bake with content

This example shows how to use the bake process to parse the templates with a provided JSON and a section.

grunt.initConfig( {
    bake: {
        build: {
            options: {
                content: "app/content.json",
                section: "en"
            }

            files: {
                "app/index.html": "app/base.html"
            }
        }
    }
} )

app/content.json:

{
    "en": {
        "title": "Hello World"
    },

    "de": {
        "title": "Hallo Welt"
    }
}

app/base.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <!--(bake includes/container.html)-->
    </body>
</html>

app/includes/container.html:

<div id="container">{{title}}</div>

This bake task will create app/index.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="container">Hello World</div>
    </body>
</html>

Inline attributes

In addition to the file the bake anchor tag also allows for inline attributs which will override the content from the JSON file. Note: Please note that the parsing of inline attributes requires double quotes in the definition as shown in the example

Same scenario as above.

app/base.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <!--(bake includes/container.html title="Salut Monde" name="Mathias")-->
    </body>
</html>

app/includes/container.html:

<div id="container">{{title}}</div>
<span>{{name}}</span>

This bake task will create app/index.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <div id="container">Salut monde</div>
        <span>Mathias</span>
    </body>
</html>

IF Statement

The bake task also allows a simple if conditional. Inline attributes named _if are treated as such. If the value that _if holds can't be found in the content.json or if found equals to the value false the include will be ignored. The _if can also be used inverted to create a _else effect in a way. A definition as _if="!name" would mean the template will be rendered when name cannot be found or is false.

app/base.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <!--(bake includes/container.html _if="name")-->
    </body>
</html>

app/content.json:

{
    "foo": "bar"
}

This bake task will create app/index.html:

<html>
    <body>

    </body>
</html>

Additionally the the _if statement also works with inlining the bake content.

<html>
    <body>
        <!--(bake-start _if="name")-->
        <h1>{{name}}</h1>
        <!--(bake-end)-->
    </body>
</html>

Foreach Loop

Another special inline attribute is the _foreach attribute. This keyword expects a specific syntax and can be used both inline as well as pulling content from the json. This allows to loop over a set of values and using that value in the partial. It accepts an inline syntax: _foreach="name:[mike, drew, steve]" as well as a reference to an array in the json: _foreach="name:authors.names". The values from the array can then be used with the key name. This key can be chosen arbitrarily.

app/base.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <ul class="first">
            <!--(bake includes/li.html _foreach="name:[mike, drew, steve]")-->
        </ul>

        <ul class="second">
            <!--(bake includes/li.html _foreach="name:authors.names")-->
        </ul>
    </body>
</html>

app/includes/li.html:

<li>{{name}}</li>

app/content.json:

{
    "authors": {
        "names": [ "jenna", "carla", "susy" ]
    }
}

This bake task will create app/index.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <ul class="first">
            <li>mike</li>
            <li>drew</li>
            <li>steve</li>
        </ul>

        <ul class="second">
            <li>jenna</li>
            <li>carla</li>
            <li>susy</li>
        </ul>
    </body>
</html>

Just like the _if statement the _foreach also works with inlined content:

<html>
    <body>
        <ul>
        <!--(bake-start _foreach="name:[robert, susan, carl]")-->
            <li>{{name}}</li>
        <!--(bake-end)-->
        </ul>
    </body>
</html>

Inline Section statement

The _section attribute, when used inline, allows to use a specific subcontent of the values.

app/base.html:

<html>
    <body>
        <!--(bake includes/file.html _section="home")-->
        <!--(bake includes/file.html _section="about")-->
    </body>
</html>

app/includes/file.html:

<h1>{{title}}</h1>
<p>{{content}}</p>

With the following content file

{
    "home": {
        "title": "Home",
        "content": "This is home"
    },
    "about": {
        "title": "About",
        "content": "This is about"
    }
}

This will render the following:

<html>
    <body>
        <h1>Home</h1>
        <p>This is home</p>
        <h1>About</h1>
        <p>This is about</p>
    </body>
</html>

Costum process

This example shows the use of a costum process funtion.


var processFunction( source, content ) {
    return source + "<br>";
}

grunt.initConfig( {
    bake: {
        build: {
            options: {
                content: "app/content.json",
                section: "en",
                process: processFunction
            }

            files: {
                "app/index.html": "app/base.html"
            }
        }
    }
} )

Continues development

For ease of development just add the bake task to your watch list. The static page will be baked everytime you change the template.

watch: {
    bake: {
        files: [ "app/includes/**" ],
        tasks: "bake:build"
    }
}
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