idb-wrapper

A cross-browser wrapper for IndexedDB

npm install idb-wrapper
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About

IDBWrapper is a cross-browser wrapper for the HTML5 IndexedDB API. While this API is the future of offline storage, it is not very intuitive to use. IDBWrapper is there to provide easy access to IndexedDB's features.

Browser Support

IDBWrapper works on all browsers supperting the IndexedDB API, which are:

Desktop

  • Chrome
  • Firefox
  • Opera 15+
  • IE 10+

Mobile

  • Chrome for Android
  • Firefox for Android
  • Opera for Android
  • IE10 for WP8

Worker IDBWrapper runs inside of a worker on following browsers:

  • Chrome
  • Chrome for Android
  • Firefox
  • Opera
  • Opera for Android
  • IE10
  • IE10 for WP8

Tutorials

There are two tutorials to get you up and running:

Part 1: Setup and CRUD operations http://jensarps.de/2011/11/25/working-with-idbwrapper-part-1/

Part 2: Running Queries against the store http://jensarps.de/2012/11/13/working-with-idbwrapper-part-2/

Examples

There are some examples to run right in your browser over here: http://jensarps.github.com/IDBWrapper/example/

The source for these examples are in the example folder of this repository.

API Reference

There's an API reference over here: http://jensarps.github.com/IDBWrapper/jsdoc/IDBStore.html

You can create a local version of the reference using a terminal. Go into the IDBWrapper directory and run the following command:

$ make doc

Obtaining IDBWrapper

You can git clone the repository, or download a zip file here: https://github.com/jensarps/IDBWrapper/tags

IDBWrapper is also available on cdnjs, so you can directly point a script tag there, or require() it from there. cdnjs supports http, https and spdy, so you can just leave the protocol off. The URL is:

//cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/idbwrapper/1.4.0/idbstore.min.js

If you use NPM as your package manager, you can get it from there, too, by running:

$ npm install idb-wrapper

If you use bower as your package manager, run the following:

$ bower install idbwrapper

If you want to add IDBWrapper to a volo project, just run:

$ volo add idbwrapper

Usage

Including the idbstore.js file will add an IDBStore constructor to the global scope.

Alternatively, you can use an AMD loader such as RequireJS, or a CommonJS loader to load the module, and you will receive the constructor in your load callback (the constructor will then, of course, have whatever name you call it).

You can then create an IDB store:

var myStore = new IDBStore();

You may pass two parameters to the constructor: the first is an object with optional parameters, the second is a function reference to a function that is called when the store is ready to use.

The options object may contain the following properties (default values are shown -- all properties are optional):

{
  storeName: 'Store',
  storePrefix: 'IDBWrapper-',
  dbVersion: 1,
  keyPath: 'id',
  autoIncrement: true,
  indexes: [],
  onStoreReady: function(){},
  onError: function(error){ throw error; }
}

'storeName' is the name of the store: for different stores, use different names.

'storePrefix' is an additional prefix; the created database will finally have the name "storePrefix+storeName". You can safely ignore this property, but if you want to have full control over the IDB name, you can pass your own prefix.

'dbVersion' is the version number of your store. You'll only have to provide this if you change the structure of the store at a later time.

'keyPath' is the name of the property to be used as key index. If autoIncrement is set to true, the database will automatically add a unique key to the keyPath index when storing objects missing that property. If you want to use out-of-line keys, you must set this property to null (see below for details on out-of-line keys).

'indexes' contains objects defining indexes (see below for details on indexes).

'autoIncrement' is a boolean and toggles, well, auto-increment on or off. You can leave it to true, even if you do provide your own ids.

'indexes' is an array of indexes. See below for further info on indexes.

'onError' gets called if an error occurred while trying to open the store. It receives the error instance as only argument.

As an alternative to passing a ready handler as second argument, you can also pass it in the 'onStoreReady' property. If a callback is provided both as second parameter and inside of the options object, the function passed as second parameter will be used.

Out-of-line Keys

IDBWrapper supports working with out-of-line keys. This is a feature of IndexedDB, and it means that an object's identifier is not kept on the object itself. Usually, you'll want to go with the default way, using in-line keys. If you, however, want to use out-of-line keys, note that the put() and batch() methods behave differently, and that the autoIncrement property has no effect – you MUST take care of the ids yourself!

Methods

Here's an overview of available methods in IDBStore:

Data Manipulation

Use the following methods to read and write data (all methods in this section return the IDBTransaction they open):


1) The put method.

put(/*Object*/ dataObj, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

dataObj is the Object to store. onSuccess will be called when the insertion/update was successful, and it will receive the keyPath value (the id, so to say) of the inserted object as first and only argument. onError will be called if the insertion/update failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument. If the store already contains an object with the given keyPath id, it will be overwritten by dataObj.

Out-of-line Keys

If you use out-of-line keys in your store, you must provide a key as first argument to the put method:

put(/*Anything*/ key, /*Object*/ dataObj, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

The onSuccess and onError arguments remain optional.


2) The get method.

get(/*keyPath value*/ key, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

key is the keyPath property value (the id) of the object to retrieve. onSuccess will be called if the get operation was successful, and it will receive the stored object as first and only argument. If no object was found with the given keyPath value, this argument will be null. onError will be called if the get operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.


3) The getAll method.

getAll: function(/*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

onSuccess will be called if the getAll operation was successful, and it will receive an Array of all objects currently stored in the store as first and only argument. onError will be called if the getAll operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.


4) The remove method.

remove: function(/*keyPath value*/ key, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

key is the keyPath property value (the id) of the object to remove. onSuccess will be called if the remove operation was successful, and it should receive false as first and only argument if the object to remove was not found, and true if it was found and removed.

NOTE: FF 8 will pass the key to the onSuccess handler, no matter if there is an corresponding object or not. Chrome 15 will pass null if removal was successful, and call the error handler if the object wasn't found. Chrome 17 will behave as described above.

onError will be called if the remove operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.


5) The clear method.

clear: function(/*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

onSuccess will be called if the clear operation was successful. onError will be called if the clear operation failed and it will receive the error event object as first and only argument.

Batch Operations

IDBWrapper allows to run a single method when dealing with multiple objects. All methods in this section return the IDBTransaction they open.

1) The getBatch method.

getBatch: function (/*Array*/keyArray, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError, /*String?*/arrayType)

This method takes an array of keys and fetches matching objects.

keyArray must be an array of keys identifying the objects to fetch.

arrayType defines the type of array to pass to the success handler. May be one of 'sparse', 'dense' or 'skip'. Defaults to 'sparse'. This parameter specifies how to handle the situation if a get operation did not throw an error, but there was no matching object in the database. In most cases, 'sparse' provides the most desired behavior. See the examples for details:

// given that there are two objects in the database with the keypath
// values 1 and 2, and the call looks like this:
myStore.getBatch([1, 5, 2], onError, function (data) { … }, arrayType);

// this is what the `data` array will be like:

// arrayType == 'sparse':
// data is a sparse array containing two entries and having a length of 3:
       [Object, 2: Object]
         0: Object
         2: Object
         length: 3
         __proto__: Array[0]
// calling forEach on data will result in the callback being called two
// times, with the index parameter matching the index of the key in the
// keyArray.

// arrayType == 'dense':
// data is a dense array containing three entries and having a length of 3,
// where data[1] is of type undefined:
       [Object, undefined, Object]
         0: Object
         1: undefined
         2: Object
         length: 3
         __proto__: Array[0]
// calling forEach on data will result in the callback being called three
// times, with the index parameter matching the index of the key in the
// keyArray, but the second call will have undefined as first argument.

// arrayType == 'skip':
// data is a dense array containing two entries and having a length of 2:
       [Object, Object]
         0: Object
         1: Object
         length: 2
         __proto__: Array[0]
// calling forEach on data will result in the callback being called two
// times, with the index parameter not matching the index of the key in the
// keyArray.

2) The putBatch method.

putBatch: function (/*Array*/dataArray, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

putBatch takes an array of objects and stores them in a single transaction.

Out-of-line Keys

The putBatch method does not support out-of-line keys. If you need to store multiple out-of-line objects, use the batch method.


3) The removeBatch method.

removeBatch: function (/*Array*/keyArray, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

removeBatch takes an array of keys and removes matching objects in a single transaction.


4) The batch method.

batch: function (/*Array*/operations, /*Function?*/onSuccess, /*Function?*/onError)

This method allows you to combine put and remove actions in a single call. batch expects an array of operations that you want to apply in a single IndexedDB transaction. operations is an Array of objects, each containing two properties, defining the type of operation. There are two operations supported, put and remove. A put entry looks like this:

{ type: "put", value: dataObj } // dataObj being the object to store

A remove entry looks like this;

{ type: "remove", key: someKey } // someKey being the keyPath value of the item to remove

You can mix both types in the operations Array:

batch([
  { type: "put", value: dataObj },
  { type: "remove", key: someKey }
], onSuccess, onError)

onSuccess will be called if all operations were successful and will receive no arguments. onError will be called if an error happens for one of the operations and will receive three arguments: the Error instance, the type of operation that caused the error and either the key or the value property (depending on the type).

If an error occurs, no changes will be made to the store, even if some of the given operations would have succeeded.

Out-of-line Keys

If you use out-of-line keys, you must also provide a key to put operations:

{ type: "put", value: dataObj, key: 12345 } // also add a `key` property containing the object's identifier

Index Operations

To create indexes, you need to pass the index information to the IDBStore() constructor, for example:

{
  storeName: 'customers',
  dbVersion: 1,
  keyPath: 'customerid',
  autoIncrement: true,
  onStoreReady: function(){},
  indexes: [
    { name: 'lastname', keyPath: 'lastname', unique: false, multiEntry: false }
  ]
}

An entry in the index Array is an object containing the following properties:

The name property is the identifier of the index. If you want to work with the created index later, this name is used to identify the index. This is the only property that is mandatory.

The keyPath property is the name of the property in your stored data that you want to index. If you omit that, IDBWrapper will assume that it is the same as the provided name, and will use this instead.

The unique property tells the store whether the indexed property in your data is unique. If you set this to true, it will add a uniqueness constraint to the store which will make it throw if you try to store data that violates that constraint. If you omit that, IDBWrapper will set this to false.

The multiEntry property is kinda weird. You can read up on it here: http://www.w3.org/TR/IndexedDB/#dfn-multientry. However, you can live perfectly fine with setting this to false (or just omitting it, this is set to false by default).

If you want to add an index to an existing store, you need to increase the version number of your store, as adding an index changes the structure of the database.

To modify an index, modify the object in the indexes Array in the constructor. Again, you need to increase the version of your store.

In addition, there are still some convenience methods available:


1) The hasIndex method.

hasIndex: function(/*String*/ indexName)

Return true if an index with the given name exists in the store, false if not.


2) The getIndexList method.

getIndexList: function()

Returns a DOMStringList with all existing indices.

Running Queries

To run queries, IDBWrapper provides a query() and an iterate() method. To create keyRanges, there is the makeKeyRange() method. In addition to these, IDBWrapper comes with a count() method. The query, iterate and count methods return the IDBTransaction they open.


1) The iterate method.

iterate: function(/*Function*/ onItem, /*Object*/ iterateOptions)

The onItem callback will be called once for every match. It will receive three arguments: the object that matched the query, a reference to the current cursor object (IDBWrapper uses IndexedDB's Cursor internally to iterate), and a reference to the current ongoing transaction.

There's one special situation: if you didn't pass an onEnd handler in the options objects (see below), the onItem handler will be called one extra time when the transaction is over. In this case, it will receive null as only argument. So, to check when the iteration is over and you won't get any more data objects, you can either pass an onEnd handler, or check for null in the onItem handler.

The iterateOptions object can contain one or more of the following properties:

The index property contains the name of the index to operate on. If you omit this, IDBWrapper will use the store's keyPath as index.

In the keyRange property you can pass a keyRange.

The order property can be set to 'ASC' or 'DESC', and determines the ordering direction of results. If you omit this, IDBWrapper will use 'ASC'.

The autoContinue property defaults to true. If you set this to false, IDBWrapper will not automatically advance the cursor to next result, but instead pause after it obtained a result. To move the cursor to the next result, you need to call the cursor object's continue() method (you get the cursor object as second argument to the onItem callback).

The filterDuplicates property is an interesting one: If you set this to true (it defaults to false), and have several objects that have the same value in their key, the store will only fetch the first of those. It is not about objects being the same, it's about their key being the same. For example, in the customers database are a couple of guys having 'Smith' as last name. Setting filterDuplicates to true in the above example will make iterate() call the onItem callback only for the first of those.

The writeAccess property defaults to false. If you need write access to the store during the iteration, you need to set this to true.

In the onEnd property you can pass a callback that gets called after the iteration is over and the transaction is closed. It does not receive any arguments.

In the onError property you can pass a custom error handler. In case of an error, it will be called and receives the Error object as only argument.


2) The query method.

query: function(/*Function*/ onSuccess, /*Object*/ queryOptions)

The query() method is just like the iterate() method, except that it will call the onSuccess callback with an array of the matched objects instead of calling a callback for each item.

The onSuccess callback will be called if the operation was successful, and it will receive an array objects as only argument.

The queryOptions object can contain one or more of the following properties:

The index property contains the name of the index to operate on. If you omit this, IDBWrapper will use the store's keyPath as index.

In the keyRange property you can pass a keyRange.

The order property can be set to 'ASC' or 'DESC', and determines the ordering direction of results. If you omit this, IDBWrapper will use 'ASC'.

The filterDuplicates property is an interesting one: If you set this to true (it defaults to false), and have several objects that have the same value in their key, the store will only fetch the first of those. It is not about objects being the same, it's about their key being the same. For example, in the customers database are a couple of guys having 'Smith' as last name. Setting filterDuplicates to true in the above example will make iterate() call the onItem callback only for the first of those.

In the onError property you can pass a custom error handler. In case of an error, it will be called and receives the Error object as only argument.


3) The makeKeyRange method.

makeKeyRange: function(/*Object*/ keyRangeOptions)

Returns an IDBKeyRange.

The keyRangeOptions object must have one or more of the following properties:

lower: The lower bound of the range

excludeLower: Boolean, whether to exclude the lower bound itself. Default: false

upper: The upper bound of the range

excludeUpper: Boolean, whether to exclude the upper bound itself. Default: false

only: If you want a key range around only one value, pass just this property.


4) The count method.

count: function(/*Function*/ onSuccess, /*Object*/ countOptions)

The onSuccess receives the result of the count as only argument.

The countOptions object may have one or more of the following properties:

index: The name of an index to operate on.

keyRange: A keyRange to use

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