kaeng

A simplified wrapper around nodejitsu's http-proxy

npm install kaeng
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kaeng

a simplified wrapper around nodejitsu's http-proxy

Introduction

'kaeng' is a small package we use around the office to implement a simple tls-aware, hostname-based reverse proxy. This code will listen on ports 80 and 443 on a "real" network interface and proxy HTTP and HTTPS requests to ports on different ports on localhost based on the hostname in the request.

Installation

To install with NPM, issue this command:

    npm install kaeng

Or, to get the (even more) bleeding edge code, use GIT:

    git clone git://github.com/OhMeadhbh/kaeng.git

Configuration

Once you've downloaded the package, copy the proxyroutes-example.json file to proxyroutes.json and open it in your favorite editor. The example file shows a configuration with three "zones": production, development and secure. Each zone is an element in the JSON object in the proxyroutes.json file.

{
  "production": {
    "ssl": false,
    "port": 80,
    "router": {
      "local.example.com": "127.0.0.1:9000",
      "local.example.net": "127.0.0.1:9001",
      "local.example.org": "127.0.0.1:9002"
    }
  },
  "development": {
    "ssl": false,
    "port": 8080,
    "router": {
      "local.example.com": "127.0.0.1:19000",
      "local.example.org": "127.0.0.1:19002"
    }
  },
  "secure": {
    "ssl": true,
    "port": 443,
    "ciphers": "AES:!LOW:!MEDIUM:!aNULL:!eNULL:!EXPORT:!CAMELLIA:!DES:!3DES",
    "router": {
      "local.example.com": "127.0.0.1:29000"
      "local.example.net": "127.0.0.1:29001"
    }
  }
}

The first two zones (production and development) are non-secure (i.e. - non https.) You can see this because the "ssl" member of the zone object is "false". The "production" zone routes requests that come in from port 80 to local ports 9000, 9001 or 9002 depending on the hostname in the request.

If you wanted to deploy a service on local.example.com, you would build your service normally, but instead of listening on port 80, you would listen on port 9000 on the local interface (127.0.0.1).

The "secure" zone works the same way, except you have the option of adding "ciphers" and "secureProtocol" members that describe the ciphers you want to use and the version of TLS you want to support.

Before using the secure option, you must generate keys for each host specified in the zone's router object. Keys are named .key while certs are

.crt. So, for example, in the example above, we would need the files: local.example.com.key, local.example.com.crt, local.example.net.key and local.example.net.crt before continuing.

You'll also need a default key and cert called "localhost.key" and "localhost.crt". The default key is used if an unknown host is specified, so it's up to you to determine how secure this key (and cert) should be. We frequently use self-signed certs for the default. (For a quick and easy way to generate a self signed cert, see gssc script at https://gist.github.com/OhMeadhbh/6201808.)

Deployment

Once you've configured your proxy, install the pre-requesite packages with the command:

    make

Once that completes, you can start it with the command:

    node kaeng.js --config file://proxyroutes.json

Assuming it works correctly and you're on a Debian-based system (including most recent versions of Ubuntu) you can install it as a self-starting service with the command:

    make install-deb

This will copy the kaeng package to /opt/kaeng and copy a startup script into /etc/init.d/kaeng. Beware, however, as the startup script assumes node is installed in /opt/node.

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