kin

Generate Hierarchial Families of Fixtures

npm install kin
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Kin — Generate Hierarchial Families of Fixtures

Authors

[Luc Castera] (https://github.com/dambalah) [Intellum] (http://www.intellum.com/)

Examples

We recommend the use of Faker for generating test data.

Fixed Values

Create a User blueprint with fixed values for properties

kin.blueprint('UserA', {
  username: 'joe',
  email: 'joe@example.com'
})

Generate a User object. The returned user will have the properties supplied in the template.

kin.generate('UserA', function(err, user) {
  assert.deepEqual(user, {username: 'joe', email: 'joe@example.com'})
})

As expected, if we generate another User, we'll get the same values every time.

kin.generate('UserA', function(err, user) {
  kin.generate('UserA', function(err, anotherUser) {
    assert.equal(anotherUser.username, user.username)
    assert.equal(anotherUser.email, user.email)
  })
})

Overriding Values at Generation Time

You can optionally pass a second parameter to generate. These values will override any values provided in the blueprint.

kin.generate('UserA', {username: 'bill'}, function(err, user) {
  assert.equal(user.username, 'bill') // uses the overridden value
  assert.equal(user.email, 'joe@example.com') // uses the blueprint value
})

Overriding properties can also contain keys that aren't specified in the original blueprint.

kin.generate('UserA', {manager: 'alice'}, function(err, user) {
  assert.equal(user.username, 'joe') // uses the blueprint value
  assert.equal(user.email, 'joe@example.com') // uses the blueprint value
  assert.equal(user.manager, 'alice') // non-blueprint key
})

Instantiating Custom Models

Kin can optionally generate custom models for you, so long as your model's constructor takes a set of properties.

For instance, you might use this as your model's constructor:

/* User Constructor */
var UserB = function(properties) {
  properties = properties || {}
  this.username = properties.username
  this.email = properties.email || this.username + '@example.com'
}

Specify the constructor you'd like to use with the special _model property. Note: you won't find the _model property on the generated object.

kin.blueprint('UserB', {
  _model: UserB,
  username: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.userName()) 
  }
})

Kin will use the supplied constructor when generating this model, passing-in any generated values as the first (and only) argument.

kin.generate('UserB', function(err, user) {
  assert.ok(user.username && user.username.length)
  assert.equal(user.email, user.username + '@example.com') // Test against constructor behaviour to ensure it was used. 
  assert.ok(user instanceof UserB)
  assert.equal(user._model, undefined) // _model is not stored on the object
})

Dynamic Values

Generating fixed values isn't much fun. We can also define asyncronous functions as dynamic generators for properties.

kin.blueprint('UserC', {
  username: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.userName())
  },
  email: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.email())
  }
})

kin.generate('UserC', function(err, user) {
  assert.ok(user.username) // some random username as defined by Faker, eg "Rupert_Mertz"
  assert.ok(user.email) // some random email as defined by Faker, eg "Brook_Bednar@price.us"
})

Generating another user should always run the matching generation function, generating different data each time

kin.generate('UserC', function(err, user) {
  kin.generate('UserC', function(err, anotherUser) {
    assert.notEqual(anotherUser.username, user.username)
    assert.notEqual(anotherUser.email, user.email)
  })
})

Remember When using a generation function, you must always use a callback to return the value, in the standard err, value format: callback(err, value1[, value2, value3... valueN])

Multiple Values

Sometimes we need to generate multiple values for a parent object. For example, we might want to generate many tags for a Document We can setup our tags property to create a single 'tag'.

kin.blueprint('Document', {
  content: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Lorem.sentence()) //  example content
  },
  tags: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Lorem.words(1).pop()) // generate a single word
  }
})

Then, you can specify the number you'd like to create when calling generate. If the blueprint property is a function, and the overridden property is a Number it will call the property generator function N times, and will return the results as an array.

kin.generate('Document', {tags: 5}, function(err, document) {
  assert.equal(document.tags.length, 5) // generates a document with 5 tags
})

/* Example output for `kin.generate('Document', {tags: 5})` */
var GeneratedDocumentExample = {
  content: 'perferendis reiciendis sequi qui eum labore',
  tags: [
    'magnam',
    'inventore',
    'facere',
    'ut',
    'rerum'
  ]
}

kin.generate('Document', {tags: 30}, function(err, document) {            
  assert.equal(document.tags.length, 30) // generates a document with 30 tags
})

Nesting Models

A common use case for generating multiple values is creating multi-level model hierarchies.

kin.blueprint('UserD', {
  username: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.userName())
  },
  email: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.email())
  },
  documents: function(callback) {
    kin.generate('Document', {tags: 3}, callback) // Use Kin to generate a document
  }
})

We can easily generate a User with some number of Documents by simply passing a number as the value of the documents property.

kin.generate('UserD', {documents: 5}, function(err, user) {
  assert.equal(user.documents.length, 5)
})

/* Example output for kin.generate('User', {documents: 5}) */
var GeneratedUserWithDocumentsExample =
{
  username: 'Lydia',
  email: 'Jaron@angie.biz',
  documents: [
    {
      content: 'velit at earum aut molestiae odio',
      tags: [ 'voluptatem', 'sunt', 'modi' ]
    },
    {
      content: 'eum facilis corrupti possimus qui quia',
      tags: [ 'illo', 'qui', 'dignissimos' ]
    },
    {
      content: 'debitis et nisi aut vero illo rem',
      tags: [ 'magnam', 'sunt', 'quia' ]
    },
    {
      content: 'non iusto ratione sed',
      tags: [ 'earum', 'provident', 'voluptatem' ]
    },
    {
      content: 'aut maxime aspernatur expedita aut voluptates',
      tags: [ 'voluptas', 'quo', 'et' ]
    }
  ]
}

In a real environment, you might persist your generated models to the database and instead of embedding entire objects, you only store a reference to them via their _id.

Note: Kin has built-in support for Mongoose models, you can specify Model types by the name you provided when you generated the mongoose.model. So long as Kin can find the collection via mongoose.models, you can use a String instead of a Model reference. This is implemented to save you having to manually require every model in your system.

/* Saving items might look something like this if you're using an ORM like Mongoose. */

var mongoose = require('mongoose')
mongoose.connect('kin_examples')

If you want to use mongoose with Kin, you need to pass your reference to mongoose to Kin

kin.mongoose = mongoose

/* Some fixtures we prepared earlier */
var User = require('../fixtures').User // Same as our user before, except as a Mongoose model
var Stream = require('../fixtures').Stream // Imagine a stream is like an RSS feed containing 'Activities'
var Activity = require('../fixtures').Activity // each Activity references a Stream ID

kin.blueprint('Stream', {
  _model: 'Stream',
  title: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Lorem.words(1).pop())
  }
})

kin.blueprint('UserE', {
  _model: 'User', // Note use of a String here
  username: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.userName())
  },
  email: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.email())
  },
  streams: function(callback) { // references to streams
    kin.generate('Stream', function(err, stream) {
      stream.save(function(err, savedStream) { // save the generated stream
        callback(null, stream._id)
      })
    })
  }
})

kin.generate('UserE', function(err, user) {
  _.each(user.streams, function(streamId) {
    /* The streams we generated should be saved in the DB */
    Stream.findById(streamId, function(err, found) {
      assert.ok(found)
    })
  })
})

Referencing other properties

If you want to reference another property from within a generator, use Kin.get(this, 'someProperty').

Because we 'simultaneously' execute each generator function, there's no guarantee that the generator will have run by the time we're referencing it within another property generator. Kin.get ensures the property's generator has returned a value.

Hidden or Meta properties

All properties beginning with an are not saved on the object, and instead are returned in the generate callback as properties of a third parameter, without the prefix.

var ObjectId = mongoose.Types.ObjectId

kin.blueprint('UserF', {
  _documents: function(callback) {
    kin.generate('Document', {tags: 3}, callback)
  },
  title: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Lorem.words(1).pop())
  }
})

kin.generate('UserF', {_documents: 4}, function(err, user, meta) {
  assert.equal(user._documents, undefined)
  assert.equal(meta.documents.length, 4)
})

Applying post processing to a generator

Sometimes you always want to apply a certain action to every model generated by your kin instance. e.g. saving a model. Kin allows you to apply 'post' functions for exactly this situation. Remember you must call the callback with the 'meta' property if you want to keep your meta data.

var ObjectId = mongoose.Types.ObjectId

kin.blueprint('UserG', {
  _model: 'User',
  _streams: function(callback) {
    kin.generate('Stream', callback)
  },
  title: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Lorem.words(1).pop())
  }
})

kin.post('UserG', function(user, meta, callback) {
  user.save(function(saveErr, user) {
    callback(saveErr, user, meta)
  })
})

kin.generate('UserG', {_streams: 0}, function(err, user, meta) {
  User.findById(user._id, function(err, found) {
    assert.ok(found) // ensure user was saved
  })
})

Example: save all generated Users and Streams

kin.post('UserG', function(user, meta, callback) {
  user.save(function(err, user) {
    callback(err, user, meta)
  })
})

kin.post('Stream', function(stream, meta, callback) {
  stream.save(function(err, stream) {
    callback(err, stream, meta)
  })
})


kin.generate('UserG', {_streams: 3}, function(err, user, meta) {
  User.findById(user._id, function(err, found) {
    assert.ok(found) // ensure user was saved
  })
  Stream.find(function(err, found) {
    assert.equal(found.length, 3) // ensure our 3 streams were saved
  })
})

Generator functions

Generator functions can be created so you can apply specific changes to a generator, in a certain situation. To create a generator function simply call generate with no callback. You can use generator functions just like normal, or use their additional properties to make modifications.

/* Simple example */
var generateUserSimple = kin.generate('UserA')

generateUserSimple(function(err, user, meta) {
  assert.deepEqual(user, {username: 'joe', email: 'joe@example.com'}) // as normal
})

Pass override properties when creating the generator function or when generating objects.

/*
 * All Users generated with this function will by default have username: bill,
 * overriding the value `joe` provided in the blueprint.
 */
var generateUserWithOverrides = kin.generate('UserA', {username: 'bill'})

generateUserWithOverrides(function(err, user, meta) {
  assert.deepEqual(user, {username: 'bill', email: 'joe@example.com'}) // as normal
})

generateUserWithOverrides({email: 'bill@example.com'}, function(err, user, meta) {
  assert.deepEqual(user, {username: 'bill', email: 'bill@example.com'}) // as normal
})

Applying post processing to a generator function

The main use of generator functions is to apply custom post generation processing such as saving a model. This means you can have the master blueprint only contain basic, generic data, and apply persistance or transformations on a case-by-case basis.

var generateSavedUser = kin.generate('UserH') // mongoose enhanced user
kin.blueprint('UserH', {
  _model: 'User',
  username: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.userName())
  },
  email: function(callback) {
    callback(null, Faker.Internet.email())
  }
})

generateSavedUser.post(function(user, meta, callback) {
  user.save(function(err, user) {
    callback(err, user, meta)
  })
})

generateSavedUser(function(err, user) {
  User.findById(user._id, function(err, found) {
    assert.ok(found)
  })
})
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