mongo-rest

A simple to use mongoose REST API.

npm install mongo-rest
1 downloads in the last day
33 downloads in the last week
78 downloads in the last month

MongoREST Version 3.0.7

Build status

This is an express node module to provide basic REST support to access mongodb documents via mongoose.

It then serves the content as JSON (if requested with Accept: application/json) or renders the entities as HTML (you have to provide the templates for it).

You can configure how MongoREST looks up the templates, and which resources should be served as JSON (to avoid leaking private information).

It is built to be used with ember and should work out of the box.

I use semantic versioning and my tag script to tag this module.

The library is fully tested with the mocha test framework and the should assertion library. If you contribute please make sure that you write tests for it.

The latest stable version is always in the master branch. The develop branch is cutting edge where tests regularely won't completely pass. Only checkout the develop branch if you want to contribute.

Installation

With npm:

npm install mongo-rest

Or simply download the lates version from here, and put it in node_modules/mongo-rest.

Usage

The usage of this module is quite straight forward:

  1. Include and instantiate mongo-rest.
  2. Provide mongo-rest with the mongoose models you want to support.
  3. Create a view file for each resource you want rendered as HTML.
  4. Optionally you can also define interceptors in case you want some resources to be handled exceptionally.

That's it, you're done.

1. Including and instantiating mongo-rest

MongoREST exposes a class you instatiate with your options:

var MongoRest = require('mongo-rest')
  , mongoRest = new MongoRest(app, { ...options... });
// or simply:
var mongoRest = new require('mongo-rest')(app, { ...options... });

The options for MongoRest are:

  • urlRoot: "/" The URL root
  • pathPrefix: "" The path prefix for the rest resources.
  • pathSuffix: "" The path prefix for the rest resources.

So this configuration: { urlRoot: "/my-resources/", pathPrefix: "my-", pathSuffix: "-models" } will expose the User model at this URL: /my-resources/my-users-models

  • viewPrefix: "resource_" Will be prepended to the template name
  • viewSuffix: "" Will be appended to the template name

So the configuration: { viewPrefix: "entity-views/resource_", viewSuffix: "_template" } will render a singular entity with the view /entity_views/resource_user_template and a collection with /entity_views/resource_users_template.

  • viewDataNamePrefix: "" Will be prepended to the data index
  • viewDataNameSuffix: "" Will be appended to the data index

When the user model is rendered as HTML, normally the entity is put in the user and collections are put in the users model variables. So in your jade template you can iterate over the collections with each user in users etc... With viewDataNamePrefix and viewDataNameSuffix you can change those names.

  • camelizeJSONDataKeys: true If false, all keys will be underscored.

  • JSONDataNamePrefix: "" Will be prepended to the data index

  • JSONDataNameSuffix: "" Will be appended to the data index

This is the same as for the viewDataName* configs, except for the JSON objects. So the JSON returned would be: { "prefix_user_suffix": { ...data... } } or { "prefix_users_suffix": [ ...entities... ] }

(If this is not enough flexibility for you, you can overwrite the serializeDataObjectKey and deserializeDataObjectKey function)

  • enableXhr: false Enables a JSON interface for XMLHttpRequests. Make sure you don't leak important information!
  • singleView: true Whether there is a single view or not. If not, only the collection view will be used.

When instantiated, MongoREST registers the routes with the app so that all REST routes become accessible. If you provided '/resources/' as pathPrefix then following urls will become alive for the user resource:

GET: /url-root/users (Renders a list of all users)
POST: /url-root/users (Creates a new user)

GET: /url-root/users/12345 (Renders the user with ID 12345)
PUT: /url-root/users/12345 (Updates the user with ID 12345)
DELETE: /url-root/users/12345 (Deletes the user with ID 12345)

Note: /user and /users are always both valid. So you can always access your records on the plural or singular URLs. It's up to you.

2. Adding a mongoose model as resource

To tell mongo-rest which resources it should support you simple add each mongoose model. Normally you do this in the same place you define your routes. The code is quite straight forward:

mongoRest.addResource(require('../models/user'));

// And you can pass options:
mongoRest.addResource(require('../models/user'), {
  sort: "name username -birthdate", // Default sorting
  // And all class options can be used here to be overriden for this resource:
  viewPrefix: "my_cool_resource_",
  enableXhr: false, // Shouldn't be served as JSON
  singleView: true
});

A few things differ from the class options here. Using the prefix and suffix configurations here don't work, but instead you can directly set the names.

So the options are:

  • entityView
  • collectionView
  • entityViewDataName
  • collectionViewDataName
  • entityJSONDataName
  • collectionJSONDataName

That's it. Now MongoREST nows that it has to use those models whenever the resources users or hobbies are accessed.

3. Create your views

When you access /resources/users for example, MongoREST will try to render this list. To do this it will need a template files.

Two template files are needed for each resource to...

  1. ...render a list of the resource
  2. ...render a single resource

To define where the views are located and how thy are named, look at the viewPrefix and viewSuffix options.

4. Create interceptors (Optional)

Sometimes some actions need to be taken before or after inserting, updating or deleting records.

You register an interceptor like this:

var eventName = 'post.success'
  , handler = function(info, done, req, res, next) { /* Do stuff */ done(); };

mongoRest.addInterceptor(require("../models/user"), eventName, handler);
// You can also provide the same handler for multiple event names:
mongoRest.addInterceptor(require("../models/user"), [ 'post', 'put' ], handler);

The available event names are:

  • get Called when a resource is retrieved.
  • post, post.success, post.error Called when a new resource is posted.
  • put, put.success, put.error Called when a resource is updated.
  • delete, delete.success, delete.error Called when a resource is deleted.

If you simply use the event name without .success or .error it will be called before the event will be carried out.

The parameters provided to the handler are:

  • info An object containing the doc and or the values that will be used to update the record
  • done A callback that has to be called as soon as the interceptor is finished handling the event.
       (this allows for asynchronous interceptors).
       If there was an error during the execution of an interceptor, call this function with
       the `err` object as first parameter. The invokation of the other interceptors will
       be canceled (if possible).
    
  • req
  • res
  • next

An example of an interceptor could look like this:

/**
 * Intercepts posts and puts for guestbook-messages. It compiles the provided textSource with jade, and stores
 * the old textSource in a textVersions array to provide a history.
 */
mongoRest.addInterceptor(require("../models/guestbook-message"), [ 'post', 'put' ], function(info, done) {
  // Compile the new textSource value with jade, and put the compiled code in textHtml
  info.values.textHtml = (jade.compile(info.values.textSource))({});
  // Since there is no existing doc when posting a new resource, we test if it exists...
  if (info.doc) {
    // ...and if it does we add the old textSource to the textVersions array to have a history.
    info.doc.textVersions.push(info.doc.textSource);
  }
  // Tell mongoRest that the interceptor finished intercepting the request.
  done();
});

XMLHttpRequests

Mongo-REST supports XMLHttpRequest, but since it could be a security risk, they are disabled by default. If you want to enable them simply pass the option enableXhr.

The responses from Mongo-REST for XMLHttpRequests are always JSON and look like this:

// If everything went right for entities:
{ user: doc }
// If everything went right for collections:
{ users: docs }

License

(The MIT License)

Copyright (c) 2012 Matias Meno <m@tias.me>

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the 'Software'), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS', WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

npm loves you