next-update

Tests if module's dependencies can be updated to latest version

npm install next-update
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next-update v0.2.18

Tests if module's dependencies can be updated to latest version

NPM

Build status Coverage Status dependencies devdependencies

Tests if module's dependencies can be updated to newer / latest versions without breaking the tests.

next-update --available
// shows new versions available without installing anything
next-update --latest
// checks if latest versions of 3rd party break any unit tests

Example

Imagine your nodejs module foo has the following dependencies listed in package.json

"dependencies": {
    "lodash": "~1.2.0",
    "async": "~0.2.5"
}

You would like to update lodash and async to latest versions, to not sure if this would break anything. With next-update it is easy: run command next-update in the folder with module foo. Here is the example output:

next updates:
lodash
    1.2.1 PASS
async
    0.2.6 PASS
    0.2.7 PASS
    0.2.8 PASS

Both package.json file and node_modules folder are left unchanged, and now you know that you can safely upgrade both libraries to later versions.

It even tells you the install command ;)

Use the following command to install working versions
npm install --save lodash@2.1.0

This might not appear like a big deal for a single module that is using popular 3rd party libraries with stable apis only. next-update is most useful in the larger development context, where multiple modules are being developed side by side, often by different teams. In such situations, checking if an upgrade is possible could be part of the continuous build pipeline.

You can see if your dependencies are out of date by using david, it even has badges you can add to your README files.

next-update reports the probability of success for a given dependency update using anonymous global statistics from next-update server

available updates:
package               available  from version  average success %  successful updates  failed updates
--------------------  ---------  ------------  -----------------  ------------------  --------------
grunt-contrib-jshint  0.8.0      0.7.2         100%               34                  0
grunt-bump            0.0.13     0.0.12        100%               4                   0

Install

npm install -g next-update  // installs module globally
next-update --help          // shows command line options

Anonymous usage collection

After testing each module A upgrade from version X to Y, next-update sends anonymous result to http://next-update.herokuapp.com/. The only information transmitted is:

{
    "name": "lodash",
    "from": "1.0.0",
    "to": "2.0.0",
    "success": true
}

This information is used to answer the following questions later: what is the probability module A can be upgraded from X to Y? Thus even if you do not have tests covering this particular module, you can judge how compatible version X and Y really are over the entire internet.

You can inspect data send in stats.js.

If the dependency module has been upgraded by anyone else, its statistics will be displayed with each test.

stats: deps-ok 0.0.7 -> 0.0.8 success probability 44.44% 8 success(es) 10 failure(s)

A lot of NPM modules do not have tests, but at least you can judge if someone else has success going from verion X to version Y of a dependency.

Use

Make sure the target module has unit / integration tests, and the tests can be run using npm test command.

Run next-update from the command line in the same folder as the target module. In general this tool does the following:

  1. Reads the module's dependencies (including dev) and their versions
  2. Queries npm registry to see if there are newer versions
  3. For each dependency that has newer versions available:
    1. Installs each version
    2. Runs command npm test to determine if the new version breaks the tests
    3. Installs back the current version.
  4. Reports results

Misc

  • To see what has changed in the latest version of any module, use my companion tool changed like this changed foo (foo is package name)
  • When comparing versions, keywords latest and * are both assumed to equal to "0.0.0".
  • A good workflow using next-update
    • see available new versions next-update --available
    • check latest version of each module using next-update --latest
    • install new versions of the desired modules using standard npm i dependency@version --save
  • You can use custom test command, for example next-update -t "grunt test"
    • npm test is used by default.

Development

Edit source, run unit tests, run end to end tests and release new version commands:

npm test
npm run e2e
grunt release
npm publish

3rd party libraries

  • lo-dash is used throught the code to deal with collections.
  • check-types is used to verify arguments through out the code.
  • optimist is used to process command line arguments.
  • request is used to fetch NPM registry information.
  • semver is used to compare module version numbers.
  • q library is used to handle promises. While developing this tool, I quickly ran into problems managing the asynchronous nature of fetching information, installing multiple modules, testing, etc. At first I used async, but it was still too complex. Using promises allowed to cut the program's code and the complexity to very manageable level.
  • cli-color prints colored text to the terminal.

Small print

Author: Gleb Bahmutov © 2014

License: MIT - do anything with the code, but don't blame me if it does not work.

Spread the word: tweet, star on github, etc.

Support: if you find any problems with this module, email / tweet / open issue on Github

MIT License

Copyright (c) 2014 Gleb Bahmutov

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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