node-coverage

node-coverage is a tool that measures code coverage of JavaScript application.

npm install node-coverage
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node-coverage

node-coverage is a tool that measures code coverage of JavaScript application.

Code coverage is a measure typically used in software testing to describe the degree to which the source code has been tested. This is an indirect measure of quality of your tests.

node-coverage can be used not only to extract measures on how well the application is covered by a test suite, but also to understand how much code is actually needed to load your application.

Coverage criteria

There are a large variety of coverage criteria. node-coverage measures

  • statement coverage. Whether or not each statement has been executed.
  • condition coverage. Whether or not each boolean sub-expression evaluated both to true and false.
  • decision coverage. For Javascript this implies from condition coverage.
  • function coverage. Whether or not each functions has been called. Full statement coverage doesn't imply full function coverage when empty functions are used. An empty function has full statement coverage even when it's not called.

Why statement coverage is not enough? Consider the following code:

var dangerous = createAnObject();
if (dangerous != null) {
   dangerous.doSomething();
}
dangerous.doSomethingElse();

A test suite where dangerous is always different from null runs fine and achieve 100% statement coverage, however the program fails when dangerous is null.

Such test suite has only 50% of condition coverage because the condition dangerous != null is never evaluated false.

Note that for languages where boolean operators are not short-circuited, condition coverage does not necessarly imply decision coverage. This is not the case in JavaScript.

if (a && b) {
   //...
}

When a is false, b is not evaluated at all.

a = true, b = true
a = false, b = true

has 100% decision coverage because the if evaluates both to true and false but only 75% condition coverage because b never evaluates false.

Adding a test where

a = false, b = false

won't increase condition coverage because the second condition (wheter b is true or not) is never checked by the language.

Prerequisites

node-coverage works instrumenting your JavaScript code and serving those instrumented files to your browser from a web server. Therefore it depends on

  • Optimist library to parse command line arguments.
  • UglifyJS to parse and instrument your files.
  • Express to serve instrumented files.
  • Jade a templating engine to display coverage reports.
  • mkdirp utility for recursively create directories.
  • Connect middleware layer
  • node-http-proxy http proxy for node.js

Those dependencies can be installed (from the node-coverage directory) with:

npm install

Unit tests run on Nodeunit.

The administrative interface uses for "Stats & Graph" page

Usage

node server.js -d "/var/www" -r "/var/log/reports"

This creates a server listenig on port 8080 serving the content of your folder /var/www and saving coverage reports inside /var/log/reports

Go to

http://localhost:8080

and run your test suite. When complete you must call from your scripts the function

$$_l.submit()

to submit the coverage report. The report is saved inside /var/log/reports as a JSON file.

To see the report go to the administrative interface on

http://localhost:8787

It's also possible to specify a report name from the submit function

$$_l.submit("myTestCaseReport")

Supported options

  • -h or --help list of options
  • -d or --doc-root document root of the web server. All JS files in this folder will be instrumented. Default /var/www
  • -p or --port web server port. Default 8080
  • -r or --report-dir directory where reports are stored. Default /var/log/node-coverage
  • -a or --admin-port administrative server port. Default 8787
  • --condition, --no-condition Enable or disable condition coverage. By default it's enabled.
  • --function, --no-function Enable or disable function coverage. By default it's disabled.
  • --session, --no-session Enable or disable session storage for information not strictly needed by the browser. By default it's enabled. Disabling this means that more code is sent to and from the client.
  • -i or --ignore Ignore file or folder. This file/folder won't be instrumented. Path is relative to document root.
  • --proxy Proxy mode. You can use node-coverage to instrument files on a differnt host.
  • --exit-on-submit The default behavior is to keep the server running in order to collect multiple reports. By enabling this options the server will automatically shut down when a coverage report is received. This is useful for some continous integration environment. If you want to collect more coverage reports but still be able to shut down the server when tests are done you can submit a request to '/node-coverage-please-exit'.
  • -v or --verbose Enable more verbose logging information. Default false.

By default function coverage is disabled, to enable it you can run

node server.js --function

or

node server.js --no-condition

to disable condition coverage.

You can exclude some files or folders using

node server.js -i lib/minified -i lib/jquery.js

Instrumenting offline

The server instruments JavaScript files on each request. It's possible to instrument offline your files running

node instrument.js /var/www/myApp /var/www/myInstrumentedApp

You can then run the server with

node server.js -d /var/www/myInstrumentedApp

Supported options

  • -h or --help list of options
  • -t ot test run unit tests
  • --condition, --no-condition enable or disable condition coverage. By default it's enabled.
  • --function, --no-function enable or disable function coverage. By default it's disabled.
  • -i or --ignore Ignore file or folder. This file/folder is copied in target folder but not instrumented. Path relative to the source folder.
  • -x or --exclude Exclude file or folder. This file/folder won't be copied in target folder. Path relative to the source folder.

By default function coverage is disabled, to enable it you can run

node instrument.js --function /var/www/myApp /var/www/myInstrumentedApp

or

node instrument.js --no-condition /var/www/myApp /var/www/myInstrumentedApp

to disable condition coverage.

The code generated offline is equal to the one generated by the server when session storage is disabled with --no-session.

You can also instrument a single file launching

node instrument.js myScript.js

The output is sent to standard input.

The command

node instrument /var/www/myApp /var/www/myInstrumentedApp -x .git -i lib/minified

copies and instrument all files inside myApp excluding .git which is not copied at all and lib/minified which is copied but won't be instrumented for coverage.

Collecting Coverage

When instrumented offline, files can be served

  • by node-coverage using as document root the instrumented path

  • by any other web server. Reports however should still be sent back to node-coverage either through XHR or form submit.

By default $$_l.submit sends an XHR POST request to /node-coverage-store containing the JSON report.

You can set up your server to redirect this request to node coverage or override the private method $$_l.__send. This method receives the coverage report as string.

node-coverage server accepts two types of POST request:

  • XHR with Content-type: application/json and coverage report as request body.
  • Form submit with Content-type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded and coverage report as a string inside the field coverage.

Unit Test

In order to run unit tests after cloning this repository you need to run

node instrument.js -t

JSONP API

Once the server is started you can access the built-in adminitrative interface or use it's JSONP API to get reports as JSON objects and use them in your own tools.

You can target any page in the administrative interface adding a ?callback=myJsonPCallback GET parameter. Empty space characters should be converted in %20.

Get the list of reports

http://localhost:8787/?callback=myCallback

The returned JSON is an Array of objects containing

  • id : report name
  • time : creation timestamp
  • date : creation date

Get the details of a report

http://localhost:8787/r/[id]?callback=myCallback

Replace [id] with the actual report's id.

The returned JSON has the following structure

  • global
    • statements
      • total : total number of lines,
      • covered : number of exectuded statement,
      • percentage : percentage of covered statements, float 0<>100,
    • conditions
      • total : total number of conditions,
      • coveredTrue : number of conditions evaluated to true,
      • coveredFalse : number of conditions evaluated to false,
      • percentage : percentage of conditions evaluated both true and false,
    • functions
      • total : total number of functions,
      • covered : number of functions that have been called (including empty functions),
      • percentage : percentage of functions called
  • files : map of single reports for every file. The key being the file name and the value being the file report
  • functions : history of all covered functions

By default files reports are sorted alphabetically by file name.

You can change the sorting criteria targeting

http://localhost:8787/r/[id]/sort/[what]/[how]?callback=myCallback

Where

  • what is either file for alphabetical sort or statement, condition or function to sort according to the desired metric.
  • how is either asc or desc

Get the statistics of a report

http://localhost:8787/stat/[id]?callback=myCallback

Replace [id] with the actual report's id.

The returned JSON has the following structure

  • unused : number of unused statements
  • byFile : object where the key is a file name and the value is the number of unused statements
  • byPackage : group unused statements by "package" or folder.

Get a file report

http://localhost:8787/r/[id]/file/[fileName]?callback=myCallback

Slashes in fileName must be converted into +

The returned JSON contains

  • code : highlighted code
    • src : array (one entry per line of code) where value are object with
      • s : source line
      • l : lineid of the instrumented function
      • c : list of conditions (array)
    • fns : object mapping a function id to the generated line of code
  • statements
    • total : total number of lines,
    • covered : number of exectuded statement,
    • detail : coverage detail for every line, how many times that statement was called,
    • percentage : percentage of covered statements, float 0<>100,
  • conditions
    • total : total number of conditions,
    • coveredTrue : number of conditions evaluated to true,
    • coveredFalse : number of conditions evaluated to false,
    • detail : list of conditions that evaluated 'true' or 'false' and 'all' for both
    • percentage : percentage of conditions evaluated both true and false (100 if no conditions),
  • functions
    • total : total number of functions,
    • covered : number of functions that have been called (including empty functions),
    • percentage : percentage of functions called,
    • detail : coverage detail of functions, how many times the function was called

Merge multiple reports

http://localhost:8787/merge/?report=[id]&report=[id]?callback=myCallback

Where id is the report name. It's possible to merge more than two reports adding extra &report=[id]

The returned JSON has the same structure of a single report.

It's also possible to merge multiple reports from the command line

node merge.js -o destination_report.json report1.json report2.json [... reportN.json]

Interpreters

node-coverage has a modular system for interpreting and instrumenting JavaScript files. This allows you to create an interpreter for any type of file.

The base interpreter is able to instrument standard JavaScript files, but you can create your own adding a module inside lib/interpreters with the following structure

exports.filter = {
   files : /.*/,      // a regular expression matching file names
   content : /\/\!/   // a regular expression matching file content
};

exports.interpret = function (file, content, options) {}

Filter object specifies which files are handled by the module.

  • files is mandatory, it's a regular expression matching the file name, examples are /.*/ for any file, /\.js$/ for JavaScript files
  • content is optional, it's a regular expression matching the file content. File content are checked against this expression only if their file name matches filter.files.

interpret is the function that instruments the code. It takes 3 parameters

  • file File name
  • content File content
  • options Coverage options
    • function boolean, enable function coverage
    • condition boolean, enable condition coverage

this function must return an object containing

  • clientCode the instrumented code, this is sent to the client
  • highlightedCode an array of file lines, this matches the original file statements to the corresponding line of code.

Proxy

node-coverage can also be used as an http proxy to instrument files hosted on a different machine.

node server.js --proxy -p 8000

Start the instrumentation server in proxy mode. You can configure your browser to use an http proxy targeting localhost on port 8000

You can also enable or disable condition or function coverage using the same options of a standalone server or specify a differnt path where to store coverage reports.

node server.js --proxy --no-condition -r ~/reports

At the moment it only support http, not https.

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