npm-registry-mock

mock the npm registry

npm install npm-registry-mock
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Build Status Dependency Status

npm-registry-mock

Mocked Packages

Currently mocked packages are:

underscore at 1.3.1, 1.3.3 and 1.5.1 while version 1.5.1 is the latest in this mocked registry.

request at 0.9.0, 0.9.5 and 2.27.0 while version 2.27.0 is the latest in this mocked registry.

test-package-with-one-dep at 0.0.0, with mocked dependency test-package@0.0.0.

npm-test-peer-deps at 0.0.0, with a peer dependency on request@0.9.x and a dependency on underscore@1.3.1.

test-repo-url-http at 0.0.0

test-repo-url-https at 0.0.1

test-repo-url-ssh at 0.0.1

mkdirp at 0.3.5

optimist at 0.6.0

clean at 2.1.6

async at 0.2.9, 0.2.10

checker at 0.5.1, 0.5.2

Usage

Installing underscore 1.3.1:

var mr = require("npm-registry-mock")

mr(1331, function (s) {
  npm.load({registry: "http://localhost:1331"}, function () {
    npm.commands.install("/tmp", "underscore@1.3.1", function (err) {
      // assert npm behaves right...
      s.close() // shutdown server
    })
  })
})

Defining custom mock routes:

var mr = require("npm-registry-mock")

var customMocks = {
  "get": {
    "/mypackage": [500, {"ente" : true}]
  }
}

mr({port: 1331, mocks: customMocks}, function (s) {
  npm.load({registry: "http://localhost:1331"}, function () {
    npm.commands.install("/tmp", "mypackage", function (err) {
      // assert npm behaves right with an 500 error as response...
      s.close() // shutdown server
    })
  })
})

Limit the requests for each route:

mr({
    port: 1331,
    minReq: 1,
    maxReq: 5
  }, function (s) {

Adding a new fixture

Although ideally we stick with the packages already mocked when writing new tests, in some cases it can be necessary to recreate a certain pathological or unusual scenario in the mock registry. In that case you can run

$ ./add-fixture.sh my-weird-package 1.2.3

to add that package to the fixtures directory.

Todo

  • add more use-cases
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