orchestrate

Node Driver for [Orchestrate.io](http://orchestrate.io).

npm install orchestrate
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orchestrate.js Build Status

Node Driver for Orchestrate.io.

Installation

$ npm install orchestrate

Running Tests

Currently, Orchestrate.js runs against the actual Orchestrate API. At the moment, there is no available local version to work with.

Ensure all dependencies are installed within the orchestrate director by running

$ npm install

To run tests:

$ npm test

Creating a Client

var db = require('orchestrate')(token)

Running Queries

Orchestrate comes with support for GET/PUT/DEL for key-value queries, as well as search, graph, and events. Documentation can be found here.

All queries are promise based. Just as a typical function would return a callback containing an error field followed by a result, orchestrate.js returns then and fail methods.

Key-Value

To get a value:

db.get('collection', 'key')
.then(function (result) {

})
.fail(function (err) {

})

To set a value:

db.put('collection', 'key', {
  "name": "Steve Kaliski",
  "hometown": "New York, NY",
  "twitter": "@stevekaliski"
})
.then(function (result) {

})
.fail(function (err) {

})

Orchestrate also supports conditional put statements) that determines whether or not the store operation will occur. db.put takes a fourth argument match which is either the ref value or false. If a ref value is provided an update will occur if there is a valid match, if false is provided, a create will occur if there is no match.

db.put('collection', 'key', data, 'cbb48f9464612f20') // update
db.put('collection', 'key', data, false) // create

To remove a value:

db.remove('collection', 'key', true)
.then(function (result) {

})
.fail(function (err) {

})

The last parameter is optional. If supplied the ref history will be removed as well.

Collection Listing

To list items in a collection, you can use collection listings.

db.list('collection')
.then(function (result) {
  var items = result.body.results;
})
.fail(function (err) {

})

Collection listings allow you to page through your collection in key order (sorted lexicographically so be aware of that if you have numeric keys). It is also useful to list parts of your collection starting from a particular key. For example, to list the first 10 keys starting from key 'c':

db.list('address-book', {limit:10, startKey:'c'})
.then(function (result) {

})
.fail(function (err) {

})

Note: if there is no item with key 'c', the first page will simply have the first 10 results that sort after 'c'.

Collection listings support pagination. If there are more items that follow the page that was retrieved, the result will have a 'links.next' that you can use to fetch the next page.

db.list('address-book', {limit:10, startKey:'c'})
.then(function (page1) {
  // Got First Page
  if (page1.links && page1.links.next) {
    page1.links.next.get().then(function (page2) {
      // Got Second Page
    })
  }
})
.fail(function (err) {

})

To run a quick search, you can simply provide the collection you'd like to search within, and your query. Orchestrate supports any type of query including lucene queries.

db.search('collection', 'query')
.then(function (result) {

})
.fail(function (err) {

})

If you want to include a limit or offset, the more verbose SearchBuilder is available:

db.newSearchBuilder()
.collection('users')
.limit(100)
.offset(10)
.query('steve')

Graphs

An awesome feature Orchestrate includes is the ability to generate graphs between collections. For example, consider the collections users and movies. Some user Steve will like a variety of movies. We can generate this relationship:

db.newGraphBuilder()
.create()
.from('users', 'Steve')
.related('likes')
.to('movies', 'Superbad')

We can then look up all the different items Steve likes:

db.newGraphReader()
.get()
.from('users', 'Steve')
.related('likes')

We can even take this another step further:

db.newGraphReader()
.get()
.from('users', 'Steve')
.related('friends', 'likes')

This will return all of the things that friends of Steve have liked. This assumes a friend relation has previously been defined between Steve and another user.

If we want to delete a graph relationship:

db.newGraphBuilder()
.remove()
.from('users', 'Steve')
.related('likes')
.to('movies', 'Superbad')

Events

Events are time-ordered objects that exist with the context of a Key-Value object. Consider comments on a post or messages in a thread.

Creating an event:

db.newEventBuilder()
.from('users', 'Steve')
.type('update')
.data({"text": "Hello!"})

Getting events:

db.newEventReader()
.from('users', 'Steve')
.start(1384534722568)
.end(1384535726540)
.type('update')

Removing a Collection

db.deleteCollection('users')
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