salad

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npm install salad
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Salad

Salad is supposed to be a very lightweight nodeJS framework, that brings the possibility to register routes and controllers and use popular ORM frameworks like

Getting started

In your project, do this

npm install salad

This is the basic directory setup you should have in your project:

    /app
      /collections # mostly Backbone collections
        /client
      /config
        /server
          /routes.coffee
        /shared
        /client
      /controllers
        /server
        /shared
        /client
      /models
        /server
        /shared
        /client
      /templates
        /server
        /shared
        /client
      /views # Mostly for Backbone Views
        /client
    /public
      /assets

    /bower.json
    /Gruntfile.coffee
    /package.json
    /server.js

Salad is composed of several libraries, that are used to bring together useful functionality.

  • MarionetteJS
  • Sequelize
  • Grunt
  • Bower

The whole application is instrumented using application configurations. Configurations should register routes and according controllers.

Brief "Getting started" guide

Registering Routes

/app/config/routes.coffee

Salad.Router.register (router) ->
  # register a full resources. Equivalent of
  # router.get('/photos(.:format)', 'GET').to('photos.index')
  # router.post('/photos(.:format)', 'POST').to('photos.create')
  # router.get('/photos/add(.:format)', 'GET').to('photos.add')

  # router.get('/photos/:'+resourceName+'Id(.:format)', 'GET').to('photos.show')
  # router.get('/photos/:'+resourceName+'Id/edit(.:format)', 'GET').to('photos.edit')
  # router.put('/photos/:'+resourceName+'Id(.:format)', 'PUT').to('photos.update')
  # router.del('/photos/:'+resourceName+'Id(.:format)', 'DELETE').to('photos.destroy')
  router.resource "photos", "photos", "photo"

  # registering a GET route and handle it in the index action of our index controller
  router.get("/index").to("index.index")

Resourceful controller

/app/controllers/server/usersController.coffee

class App.UsersController extends Salad.RestfulController

###
  A restful controller automatically implements CRUD actions like
  * index
  * create
  * update
  * destroy

  However, you can still replace the default actions. Take a look at
  salads src/controllers/concerns/actions.coffe file. This is where the
  default actions are defined.
###

Models

You can define models like this: (notice, that the model definition will probably change in future salad versions)

/app/models/server/todo.coffee

attributes =
  id:
    type: Sequelize.INTEGER
    autoIncrement: true
    primaryKey: true
    allowNull: true

  title: Sequelize.STRING

  createdAt: Sequelize.DATE
  updatedAt: Sequelize.DATE
  completedAt: Sequelize.DATE

options =
  tableName: "todos"

App.SequelizeTodo = App.sequelize.define "Todo", attributes, options

class App.Todo extends Salad.Model
  @dao
    type: "sequelize"
    instance: App.SequelizeTodo

  @attribute "id"
  @attribute "title"
  @attribute "createdAt"
  @attribute "updatedAt"
  @attribute "completedAt"

This basically defines a sequelize model, and passes the instance it on to our salad model. This is required, because salad provides the functionality to support many different data stores. So you could also think about Facebook, MongoDB, etc.

The actual salad model definition is this part:

class App.Todo extends Salad.Model
  @dao
    type: "sequelize"
    instance: App.SequelizeTodo

  @attribute "id"
  @attribute "title"
  @attribute "createdAt"
  @attribute "updatedAt"
  @attribute "completedAt"

this defines the model and some attributes.

In our salad application we could now do something like this:

attributes =
  title: "I am a TODO item!"

App.Todo.create attributes, (err, resource) =>
  console.log resource.toJSON()

Example of interacting with a model:

App.Todo.create title: "Test", (err, resource) =>
  console.log resource.toJSON()

# Selecting a model by id
App.Todo.find 1, (err, resource) =>
  # accessing single attributes
  resource.get("id") # returns 1

  # getting all attributes
  resource.getAttributes() # returns an object with key, value pairs

  # setting a new title. This only changes the current instance. we
  # have to save our changes
  resource.set "title", "my new title"

  resource.save (err, savedResource) =>
    # we now saved our changes


    # but instead of using `model.set` and `model.save` we could do this:

    resource.updateAttributes title: "my new title", (err, savedResource) =>
      # this also saved our changes

Querying models

Salad provides a mechanism called scopes. They are basically very dumb instances that collect arguments like conditions, sort information, etc.

When finally comleting the scope, these objects are passed on to the DAO instance. The DAO instance is responsible for translating the arguments contained in the scope to form a request to its data provider.

To illustrate:

App.Todo.asc("createdAt").limit(3).first

might produce an SQL query like this:

SELECT * FROM "todos" ORDER BY createdAt ASC LIMIT 3

As you can see, you can chain different operators on the scope.

Possible operators are:

model = App.Todo

# options is a hash object containing specific conditions
options =
  title: "test"
  completedAt: null

model.where(options)

# order ascending by title
model.asc("title")

# this can be called several times:
model.asc("title").asc("createdAt")

# same as with descending sorting
model.desc("title")

# checking if something is contained in an array (PostgreSQL i.e.)
# this checks if "work" is an element of the "tags" field.
model.contains("tags", "work")

# eager-loading of associated models
model.include([App.User])

# limiting result set
model.limit(30)

# skipping first 10 results
model.offset(10)

When you are done calling all the operators, you may finalize the scope. You do this by calling the actual method that queries the data:

model.where(completed: false).count (err, count) =>
  console.log count# 10

model.all (err, resources) =>
  # resources is an array containing the requested models

model.first (err, resource) =>
  # returns the first resource. Same as:
  model.limit(1).all (err, resources) =>
    resource = resources[1]

model.findAndCountAll (err, data) =>
  console.log data.count # 10
  console.log data.rows # Array containing resources

Fixtures

Let's assume you have a App.User model and you want to have some instances in the database for easy unit testing or just to have some data to show during development.

You can create a file test/fixtures/users.coffee:

module.exports = [
  {
    email: "user@domain.com"
    firstname: "Tom"
    lastname: "Bob"
  }
]

When you execute cake db:load the fixtures will get initialized and stored in the database.

Fixtures make it very easy for you as a developer to quickly bootstrap some data.

License

(MIT License)

Copyright (C) 2012, 2013 komola GmbH, Germany (Sebastian Hoitz hoitz@komola.de)

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.

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