strftime

strftime for JavaScript

npm install strftime
228 downloads in the last day
1 334 downloads in the last week
6 333 downloads in the last month

strftime

strftime for JavaScript, works in Node.js and browsers, supports localization. Most standard specifiers from C are supported as well as some other extensions from Ruby.

Installation

npm install strftime

Usage

var strftime = require('strftime')
console.log(strftime('%B %d, %y %H:%M:%S')) // => April 28, 2011 18:21:08
console.log(strftime('%F %T', new Date(1307472705067))) // => 2011-06-07 18:51:45

If you want to localize it:

var strftime = require('strftime')
var it_IT = {
    days: [ 'domenica', 'lunedi', 'martedi', 'mercoledi', 'giovedi', 'venerdi', 'sabato' ],
    shortDays: [ 'dom', 'lun', 'mar', 'mer', 'gio', 'ven', 'sab' ],

    months: [ 'gennaio', 'febbraio', 'marzo', 'aprile', 'maggio', 'giugno', 'luglio',
              'agosto', 'settembre', 'ottobre', 'novembre', 'dicembre' ],

    shortMonths: [ 'gen', 'feb', 'mar', 'apr', 'mag', 'giu', 'lug', 'ago',
                   'set', 'ott', 'nov', 'dic' ],
    AM: 'AM',
    PM: 'PM'
}
console.log(strftime('%B %d, %y %H:%M:%S', it_IT)) // => aprile 28, 2011 18:21:08
console.log(strftime('%B %d, %y %H:%M:%S', new Date(1307472705067), it_IT)) // => giugno 7, 2011 18:51:45

And if you don't want to pass a localization object every time you can get a localized strftime function like so:

var strftime = require('strftime')
var it_IT = { /* same as above */ }
var strftime_IT = strftime.localizedStrftime(it_IT)
console.log(strftime_IT('%B %d, %y %H:%M:%S')) // aprile 28, 2011 18:21:08

Time zones can be passed in as an offset from GMT in minutes.

var strftimeTZ = require('strftime').strftimeTZ
console.log(strftimeTZ('%B %d, %y %H:%M:%S', new Date(1307472705067), -420)) // => June 07, 11 11:51:45
console.log(strftimeTZ('%F %T', new Date(1307472705067), 120)) // => 2011-06-07 20:51:45

Alternatively you can use the timezone format used by ISO 8601, +HHMM or -HHMM.

var strftimeTZ = require('strftime').strftimeTZ
console.log(strftimeTZ('', new Date(1307472705067), '-0700')) // => June 07, 11 11:51:45
console.log(strftimeTZ('%F %T', new Date(1307472705067), '+0200')) // => 2011-06-07 20:51:45

Supported Specifiers

Extensions from Ruby are noted in the following list.

Unsupported specifiers are rendered without the percent sign. e.g. %q becomes q. Use %% to get a literal % sign.

  • A: full weekday name
  • a: abbreviated weekday name
  • B: full month name
  • b: abbreviated month name
  • C: AD century (year / 100), padded to 2 digits
  • D: equivalent to %m/%d/%y
  • d: day of the month, padded to 2 digits (01-31)
  • e: day of the month, padded with a leading space for single digit values (1-31)
  • F: equivalent to %Y-%m-%d
  • H: the hour (24-hour clock), padded to 2 digits (00-23)
  • h: the same as %b (abbreviated month name)
  • I: the hour (12-hour clock), padded to 2 digits (01-12)
  • j: day of the year, padded to 3 digits (001-366)
  • k: the hour (24-hour clock), padded with a leading space for single digit values (0-23)
  • L: the milliseconds, padded to 3 digits [Ruby extension]
  • l: the hour (12-hour clock), padded with a leading space for single digit values (1-12)
  • M: the minute, padded to 2 digits (00-59)
  • m: the month, padded to 2 digits (01-12)
  • n: newline character
  • o: day of the month as an ordinal (without padding), e.g. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, ...
  • P: "am" or "pm" in lowercase [Ruby extension]
  • p: "AM" or "PM"
  • R: equivalent to %H:%M
  • r: equivalent to %I:%M:%S %p
  • S: the second, padded to 2 digits (00-60)
  • s: the number of seconds since the Epoch, UTC
  • T: equivalent to %H:%M:%S
  • t: tab character
  • U: week number of the year, Sunday as the first day of the week, padded to 2 digits (00-53)
  • u: the weekday, Monday as the first day of the week (1-7)
  • v: equivalent to %e-%b-%Y
  • W: week number of the year, Monday as the first day of the week, padded to 2 digits (00-53)
  • w: the weekday, Sunday as the first day of the week (0-6)
  • Y: the year with the century
  • y: the year without the century (00-99)
  • Z: the time zone name, replaced with an empty string if it is not found
  • z: the time zone offset from UTC, with a leading plus sign for UTC and zones east of UTC and a minus sign for those west of UTC, hours and minutes follow each padded to 2 digits and with no delimiter between them

For more detail see man 3 strftime as the format specifiers should behave identically. If behaviour differs please file a bug.

Any specifier can be modified with -, _, or 0 as well, as in Ruby. Using %- will omit any leading zeroes or spaces, %_ will force spaces for padding instead of the default, and %0 will force zeroes for padding. There's some redundancy here as %-d and %e have the same result, but it solves some awkwardness with formats like %l.

Contributors

License

Copyright 2010 - 2013 Sami Samhuri sami@samhuri.net

MIT license

npm loves you