touchclick

Provide immediate native-like visual feedback on touch

npm install touchclick
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touchclick

This is a small jquery plugin that allows you to easily bind to the touch or click events depending on what's available for the given platform. Unlike similar scripts, this also provides immediate visual feedback on touch platforms -- just as native apps do.

Getting Started

  1. Include the touchclick.js file on the page after jquery, or require it with browserify.

  2. Bind to the touchclick event where you would have otherwise used click or touchend

     $(".menu-btn").on("touchclick", function () {
         console.log("अनित्य");
     });
    
  3. Define a .touchactive style for the given element

     .menu.btn.touchactive {
         color: #eee;
         background-color: #333;
     }
    
  4. Disable the default touch overlay so it doesn't interfere with your custom .touchactive style

     * {
             -webkit-touch-callout: none;
             -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0,0,0,0);
         }
    
  5. (Optional) For delegated events add data-touchclick="true" to the element you want the touchactive class to be added to.

     <div class="menu btn" data-touchclick="true">Menu</div>
    

Traditional Solutions

Bind to touchend

Binding to touchend or using a script such as fastclick will remove the delay for triggering the event. However, unlike touchclick, they do not provide immediate visual feedback as native apps do.

Bind to touchend + provide a :hover style

Binding to touchend or using fastclick will remove the delay and provide some visual feedback. However, unlike touchclick and most native apps, when the user removes their finger from the element the :hover style sticks. While subtle, this still leaves web apps with a somewhat laggy feel.

Rely on tap-highlight-color

Some browsers will add a large translucent overlay when items are tapped. However you do not have control over the exact style of an actively pressed element. This typically ends up looking a bit jenky.

License

Copyright (c) 2014, Derek Petersen

Licensed under the MIT license.

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